Wednesday, 23 April 2014
Special Advertising Sections
Advertise in CAM
 
Advertisement
TOP STORY
We're #1
Bookmark and Share
Print E-mail
Friday, 07 October 2011

As reported in the World Dairy Diary, a team from CALS recently won the National Intercollegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Contest at the 2011 World Dairy Expo. The Big Red tallied 2,485 points and edged Virginia Tech by virtue of tiebreaker. Rounding out the top five were Penn State, Wisconsin, and Minnesota — schools that Cornell would be unlikely to defeat in, say, football. Congratulations to coach David Galton and his team.

And for a more personal (and heartwarming) tale about cattle judging, read about the adventures of veterinarian Sally Ness at this year's New York State Fair. (Thanks to Lyn LaBar of the Vet college for bringing this to our attention.)

 
Svante Myrick '09 Elected Mayor of Ithaca Print E-mail
Friday, 16 September 2011

On November 8, CALS grad Svante Myrick '09 was elected mayor of Ithaca, getting nearly 54% of the votes in a four-way election that also included another Cornellian, Janis Kelly '71. Myrick served on the Common Council as a student and has been a prominent figure in local politics since graduating. As the Daily Sun noted, he will be the first African American mayor of Ithaca and, at 24, the youngest mayor in New York State.

Myrick had won the Democratic nomination by defeating several veteran candidates, including Pam Mackesey '89, a county legislator. As we've noted before, CAM was ahead of the pack by featuring Myrick as a rising star among recent grads in our November/December 2009 issue.

 
Ten Years Later: Remembering Lives Lost Print E-mail
Friday, 09 September 2011

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, senior editor Beth Saulnier spoke with many family members and friends of the Cornellians who died in the Twin Towers and on Flight 93. We published 16 memorials in the November/December 2001 issue, followed by four more in the two subsequent issues, as we received the news of others who had perished. To honor the lives of those 20 Cornellians and all of the other 9/11 victims, we have posted those memorials here.

 
Ten Years Later: Remembering Lives Lost Print E-mail
Friday, 09 September 2011

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, senior editor Beth Saulnier spoke with many family members and friends of the Cornellians who died in the Twin Towers and on Flight 93. We published 16 memorials in the November/December 2001 issue, followed by four more in the two subsequent issues, as we received the news of others who had perished. To honor the lives of those 20 Cornellians and all of the other 9/11 victims, we have posted those memorials here.

 

 

 

 
Pledging Banned But What Does That Mean? Print E-mail
Wednesday, 24 August 2011

In an announcement to the Cornell community and an op-ed published in the New York Times, President David Skorton announced that pledging will be banned in the Cornell Greek system, beginning with the 2012-13 academic year.

"We must end the current system of pledging, often perpetuated through traditions handed down over generations, because it fosters hazing and other activities based on humiliation or risky behavior that often pose psychological harm and immediate physical danger to those involved," Skorton said.

In an interview with the Daily Sun, Skorton went on to say, “I refuse to believe that these smart people cannot come up with an approach to replace pledging. I know we can do better, and I know we have to avoid risks associated with pledging.” He also reiterated his support for the Greek system and said he had no intention of banning fraternities and sororities at Cornell. A follow-up editorial in the Sun praises the goals of Skorton's initiative but finds it lacking in substance. In a news story, fraternity leaders expressed confusion over the directive, stating that since hazing is already banned, they're not sure what else must be done.

In her Chronicle of Higher Education blog, Professor Laurie Essig of Middlebury College says that Skorton did not go far enough—she asserts that fraternities should be banned. That won't help, says Hotel school lecturer Jan Katz in a letter to the Sun. The problem isn't fraternities—it's that students have a desire for risky behavior. "Instead of trying to change fraternities, then, the University needs to think about how better to address the underlying attitudes and values that contribute to undesirable behavior," writes Katz. "Changing the traits is not—it is impossible to eliminate a desire for risk-taking and it is also wrong to do so because risk-taking is a key requirement for innovation, entrepreneurship and other desirable outcomes."

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 55 - 63 of 173